On Sunday, China’s tech giant Huawei officially unveiled Huawei Mate X, its first foldable smar

tphone. That came just five days after Galaxy Fold, the first foldable smartphone of Samsung. But fol

dables might not be the future of smartphones, comment two experts with China Daily’s Zhang Zhouxiang:

Yuan Xuanhua, a renowned industrial designer with 20 years’ experience in smartphone engineering

Some media outlets have described foldable smartphones with so many sweet w

ords as if they were a technological breakthrough. Unfortunately, they are not. The te

chnology of foldable displays were invented as early as 20 years ago in a quite easy way — By replacing the glass th

at supports the display with foldable organic materials. Such displays can not only fold, but also curve.

Concerning the foldable screens of Huawei and Samsung, they have better displays with higher density rate and cl

earer, more stable display performance, but in essence they are still using the same technology. Therefore, f

oldable smartphones are more like a consumption-led innovation rather than a technology

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ause the camera must not be covered during the folding, while the battery is also thicker. Huawei Mate X looks better, but its display is not protected as well as that of Samsung Fold and faces higher risk of breaking should the phone be dropped.

The two share one thing in common, namely a high price — Both are rather expensive. The Samsu

ng Fold is priced at $1,980 while the Huawei Mate X is priced at 2,299 euros ($2,606). The high price will

quite seriously limit the marketing of the two products and make them the luxuries of rich people only.

According to our analysis and market forecasts, in 2019, the number of f

oldable smartphones and tablets sold globally might reach 900,000, which might do

uble in 2020. As a comparison, people globally bought 1.4 billion smartphones in 2018. In a word, unless its cost fall sh

arply, the market for foldable smartphones will be limited for the foreseeable future.

Yet both Huawei and Samsung have invested huge resources in the research, publicity, and mark

eting of foldable smartphones. There are two main causes for that. First, smartphones are already so

developed that there is hardly any new space for innovation. The iPhone 4 miracle of Steven Jobs can hardly be re

peated in the near future, so both companies need to show the world that they are innovating.

Second, foldable displays need special materials that are quite scarce i

n the market, so neither of the two companies can afford to wait for the other to rise. B

oth need to keep the market in a balance so as to ensure its own share of products.

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  seemed indicative of what was already deemed one of the most wide-open races i

n years, given the lack of consensus among guild awards leading up to Sunday’s event.

  Perhaps no surprise came bigger than best actress, as “The Favourite’s” Olivia Colman upset

seven-time nominee Glenn Close, who had marched through awards season with enough victories to m

ake her a presumptive favorite. (Colman, in an emotional speech, practically apologized to Close for wi

nning.)s for politics, a recurring theme involved the Trump administration’s immigration polices, including an early jo

ke from Maya Rudolph that among the things that wouldn’t be happening during the telecast, “Mexico is not paying for the w

all.” For his part, Malek referenced being a first-generation American, the son of Egyptian immigrants.

  Still, the most overt and rousing rejoinder belonged to Spik

e Lee — a winner for adapted screenplay for his movie “BlacKkKlansman” — who pointed to

the 2020 election, urging people to “be on the right side of history. Let’s do the right thing!” Congressman and civil-rig

hts icon John Lewis also received a prolonged ovation, introducing “Green Book.”

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  development trend of relying more on innovation, creation and creativity to foster a change in the structure and quality of financial services.

  When it comes to the support of financially-strained private enterprises, he said that

market laws shall be respected more and that targeted financial services are needed.

  Private firms who are temporarily in difficulties but engage in businesses that match well with the national industrial development plans or focus on the real eco

nomy, possess leading technologies and enjoy an advantage in the market shall be prioritized, he said.

  ”The healthy development of the real economy is the foundation to prevent and defu

se risks,” he said, adding that risk prevention must be based on steady economic growth.

  He said that the counter-cyclical adjustment roles of fiscal and monetary polic

ies must be strengthened so as to ensure the Chinese economy could run at a reasonable growth range.

  ”Risk prevention must be done in a way that can push ahead high-quality economic development,” he said.

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  An accident at a coal mine in Inner Mongolia that claimed 21 lives and injured 29 was c

aused by a brake glitch that forced a vehicle to go out of control and hit a ramp, according to local authorities.

  The accident occurred at about 8:20 am on Saturday at a mining company in North

China’s Inner Mongolia autonomous region, when a vehicle was transporting 50 workers to the mine.

  The cause of the accident is under investigation. All 29 injured were rushed to hospital and were in stable condition.

  Fu Jianhua, vice-minister of emergency management, arrived at Inner Mongolia

at 22:00 pm on Saturday with a team to supervise the rescue and investigation work.

  An emergency center which included four working teams for medical service, security and safety was set up.

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  deal breeze between meetings in a way impossible at the height of those negotiations.

  Yet a few years later, their sage experience is the valued currency of many backroom conversations.

  John Kerry’s sidekick, Wendy Sherman, strolled down t

he street past former US Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, also a member of the Iran nuclear dea

l negotiating team. He was loitering on a street corner waiting for a car. If you had a question for them, you could ask it.

  These people are the unseen grease in the cogs of international diplomacy.

  But the showstopper at the conference was the Yin and Yang of US foreign policy — delivered by Vice President Mike Pence and the guy who had the

job before him, Joe Biden.They spoke on the same day, but could not have been more different in tone, style and substance.

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  who rebel against the system. Permission is needed from a male guardian for many basic activities, including international travel.

  Reem and Rawan say they had been planning their escape in secret for two years. They didn’t dare discuss it in case they were

overheard, so, instead, they swapped WhatsApp messages, even while alone at night in their shared room.

  Before they fled, the Sri Lanka vacation was just like any other. They wore their niqabs

to the beach and sat away from the surf while their brothers swam and joked. They cooked the meals, and

spent most of their days inside. It was humid. Their niqabs stuck to their skin and made it hard to see.

  ”We travel to move from a box to another box. From home to hotel, nothing will change,” Rawan says. “They will go o

ut, they will live freely, the men, of course we will sit away, watching them doing what they want.”

Their five-year-old sister played in the sand, but their 12-year-old sister, like them,

didn’t. She too was learning that it’s OK to be a girl in Saudi Arabia — until you grow up.

During the trip, Rawan turned 18. The timing was no accident. The vacation was planned with gentle persuasion to co

incide with a birthday that, unbeknown to their mother, allowed Rawan to apply for an Australian tourist visa.

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  Russian passport in 2014. He was last seen by family members in the US in early 2017 after the death of his mother.

  He is not believed to have returned to the US since then, and his decision to remain in M

oscow means US congressional investigators can’t easily find out what he knows.

  In 2017 Geovanis was reemployed by Lebow to set up the Russian arm of another venture, Somerset Coal Inter

national, an energy technology company which claims to “clean” coal by washing it at high pressure.

  Among those approached by Geovanis for investment was Deripaska, the billionaire m

etals and mining magnate, for whom Geovanis worked in the mid-2000s, according to a person fa

miliar with Somerset Coal’s business plan, speaking on condition of anonymity.

  Deripaska is so closely aligned with Russian President Vladimir Putin that the US sanctioned

him and his companies in order to punish the Russian government for its activities around the 2016

election. The Trump administration lifted sanctions on three of those companies last month.

  A spokesperson for Deripaska did not return CNN’s requests for comment.

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party lines — hence the defections from both of the UK’s main parties. And if how you voted on Brexit ultimately dictates how you vote, what do

es that mean in the context of the rest of a political platform?
In the 2017 general election, there was a direct correlation between how a seat vot

ed in the Brexit referendum and how the Conservatives (seen as more pro-Brexit) and Labour (seen as more pro-EU

) performed respectively.
Rob Ford, Professor of Political Science at the University of Manchester and au

thor of the upcoming book Brexitland, believes that this is because Brexit was never really about Brexit. “It’s what we aca

demics call the second ideological dimension. Traditional politics relies on the demonstrable: Do you support free-ma

rket economics or regulation? The second dimension has more to do with instinct: Do you want border control or to

welcome refugees? In this sense, Brexit wasn’t really a question of how do you feel about the EU, rather, do you wa

nt to live in a progressive, global UK, or do you want to retreat and live in a more traditional country?”

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support a modern, progressive, global Britain that is very much a part of modern Europe. Cur

rently, both main say that they will deliver Brexit — albeit different versions of it. A new group in Parliament, free to vote and speak as they li

ke, can now make the case for a softer Brexit, or even a second vote, and do so in ways that could damage both the gove

rnment and the opposition.
But will they? That’s a crucial question. If the movement swells, it could create the mome

ntum for a second referendum and push one party or another (probably the Labour Party) to formally back such a vo

te. It could terrify Conservative Brexiteers into backing May on her deal. It could completely break the par

liamentary arithmetic and cause the UK to stumble into a no deal. It could force a general election in which all 11 los

e their seats. It’s very hard to tell.
But the main takeaway from this week is that these 11 MPs were so frustrated by t

heir own parties — for more reasons that just Brexit — that they needed to do something. And that it was now or never. T

hey were left with no good options because, right now, politics in the UK is spiraling out of control.

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